Interview with Ingo from Wir Sind Nicht Allein

Interview, Dec 1, 2023

Ingo from “Wir sind nicht allein” kindly invited me to an interview on December 1, 2023, which was a great opportunity for me to talk about my work and share my experiences.

Through his various social media channels, Ingo runs an exciting project in German language, called “Wir sind nicht allein” (We are not alone), primarily dedicated to researching the influence of extraterrestrials on human history over maybe thousands of years.

The interview was conducted in German and is available on Facebook.

Below, you can find a translated version.

Make sure to pay a visit to Ingo too, as he has captivating content to share.

The Interview

Hello and welcome to “(extra)Terrestrials”
Ingo from WIR SIND NICHT ALLEIN in conversation with: Alex Müller, 01.12.2023

Ingo:
Hello Alex! Please tell us something about yourself first! Who are you? Where are you from?
And what exciting things are you working on?

Alex:
Hello, my name is Alex Müller and I am from near Karlsruhe.
I discovered photography a little over a year ago (as an absolute beginner). As I have been dealing with various spiritual topics for a while now, including special places of power, I then came up with the idea: “Why not just combine the two?”

Ingo:
So photography was actually what was missing so that you could present your experiences and observations in an appropriate way? What else motivated you to do so?

Alex:
Inspired by some remarkable citizen archaeologists here in Baden-Württemberg, I then set out myself to visit such places with my camera and capture my impressions.
What I repeatedly encountered and personally experienced at these places, even in my immediate and supposedly familiar surroundings, often left me speechless and changed my view of established historiography fundamentally!

Ingo:
You were impressed? What was so unusual for you?

Alex:
Besides ancient cult sites, I also found the remains of massive stone structures, for example, some of which were reminiscent of megalithic ruins that exist in various parts of the world.
Things that shouldn’t actually exist here! The official explanations and interpretations sometimes didn’t really fit with what I saw myself.

Ingo:
So that was your starting point, to go deeper? What happened then?

Alex:
At some point I was sure that these historical treasures, many of them still undiscovered, exist all over the world. They are just unexplored or often simply misinterpreted.
I had to share these findings and seek the opinions of others.
Then I started to post my pictures on Instagram and at the same time created a blog and community website.

Ingo:
I’ve been following you on Instagram for a long time and your blog has a very professional design!
Your photos are very good – so it doesn’t look like a “beginner” to me!
I can therefore only recommend your two platforms!

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Here are the links:
https://instagram.com/mystictrails.community
https://mystictrails.net/
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As I understand you, it’s not just about exposing your photographic work. You illustrate the anomalies and curiosities you discover in a documentary, even artful way. There is clearly ” heart and soul” in it.
What exactly are you aiming to achieve?

Alex:
The objective was to provide a platform for amateur researchers and interested people all over the world to exchange experiences and work together on finding the truth.
Everything is currently still in its infancy and operated purely as a hobby alongside a normal job, as scarce time allows.

Ingo:
From your research in the field and all the impressive pictures – have you already come up with your own explanations for one or the other unusual stone formation?
Or to put it more generally: Who or what, in your opinion, has left us these things?

Alex:
I haven’t come up yet with any verifiable explanations, but I have speculations:
That is, that one or perhaps even several successive civilizations were once at work, of which nothing can be found in the historical record anymore nowadays!
My region has a rich Celtic past, and several such sites are attributed to the Celts (dating back around 2000-3000 years).
This usually sounds plausible, but then there are repeatedly remains of structures in the immediate vicinity that appear so gigantic or, in other words, “megalithic”, that it is difficult to consider them as naturally formed, or that they could have been created by a “technologically quite limited” community.

Ingo:
So you mean submerged or lost civilizations? What do you personally conclude from this?

Alex:
For me, the question arises: had the Celts discovered ruins that were already age-old in their time and built their own sanctuaries there?
Incidentally, the ancient Romans (and the Church to this day) always sought to be near these places.

Ingo:
Wow. That rings a bell! My father is a member of a historians’ association and has been getting to the bottom of these things here in my region (Erzgebirge, Saxony) for years.
So for me, too, there is no question that in the course of Christianization, old sacred sites were either simply destroyed, adapted or built over by the new powers.
Do you also travel to other German federal states or even internationally to investigate these mysteries and take such great photos?

Alex:
So far I’ve limited my research to the surrounding area, i.e. Southwest Germany and Alsace, and I sometimes take a 2-3 hour drive. There’s still a lot to discover here.
But yes, I am already thinking of expanding this radius.
One dream would be to tour Europe for months with a camper van.
As soon as the financing issue has been clarified, I will tackle this…

Ingo:
Awesome! We certainly wish you that!
At this point I just have to ask: Can you make any sense of Erich von Däniken’s theory? Or that of Graham Hancock? In connection with your speculations? Or do you always rely on your own “gut feeling”?

Alex:
Sure, if you travel to such places as I do, then sooner or later you almost can’t get past the mentioned authors. However, I don’t think I’m yet ready to commit myself to their theories and those of comparable researchers. The latter carries the risk of unintentionally and unwittingly closing oneself off to other perspectives too soon.
In general, I do not want to be a missionary, i.e. present a certain truth. What I do is rather a kind of: “I see this and what do you see?'” …and that’s how it should stay for the foreseeable future.

Ingo:
An interesting and very modest approach!
Your website is – by the way very professional – also international. The texts are in English. I like the idea of sharing regional phenomena with the world!
I myself report a lot about unusual things from Brazil. My wife and most of my followers come from there.
Do you have international followers? Do you also get feedback in the sense that people from far away tell you about these kinds of things from their region?

Alex:
Thank you. I have a long professional IT background. Of course, that made it easier to set up the site.
It was exactly this idea that drove me, to connect people with the same interests from all over the world. Whether they are actively researching and sharing discoveries or insights, or just enjoy reading along.
As you may have seen, the site has very few members so far and I am aware that it is very difficult to create an independent blog and/or community in the age of “social media overkill”.
But why not give it a try anyway? The investment is time and passion – for something I enjoy anyway!

Ingo:
It is really apparent and I hope you get many new interested members, not least through this interview!
What wishes, dreams or new projects do you have for the future?
What would you like to see from science, historiography and the contemporary spirit to respond appropriately to your data and findings?

Alex:
I don’t really have any major wishes or dreams, and as far as projects are concerned, I’ll probably be concentrating mainly on my work here for the time being. I can’t yet foresee whether and what might come next.
I have no expectations of science and historical research. There is more information freely and easily available today than ever before. Information that in combination with curiosity, persistence, a healthy dose of skepticism, impartiality, down-to-earthness and personal experience, among other things, could perhaps even make such institutions obsolete for some people!
These are exactly the individuals I want to reach!
And as far as the general “Zeitgeist” is concerned, subject areas like ours will probably always be something of a niche for the “confused” anyway.

Ingo:
Fortunately, times are changing. Not least because of dedicated researchers like you!
You obviously feel comfortable with what you do and how you do it! So you are far from being satisfied with your findings? Are you staying curious?

Alex:
I think the time is not yet right to draw a final conclusion!
The journey continues!

Ingo:
That’s what I wanted to hear! The last words now belong to you!
Thank you for the very interesting conversation, your time and your thoughts!

Alex:
Thank you too, dear Ingo, for the opportunity to introduce myself here! My first interview and it was really fun!

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The interview with Alex Müller took place on 01.12.2023.
Thank you again at this point!!!
Stay curious!

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